Gospel and State of Grace – Perfect Contrition and the Abolition of Hell

Card-_110-Contrition-front[1].jpgHe who understands the gospel will never fall from the state of grace – no matter what sins he commits – because to understand the gospel is to experience perfect contrition, and perfect contrition is the abolition of Hell. If you are unable to detect perfect contrition within yourself, you have not yet understood the gospel. Someone who understands the gospel with their mind, naturally overflows with both Joy and Sorrow in their heart: Joy at the unconditional promise of an eternity spent with God, sorrow at the reality that he daily fails to live up to his destiny.

It is impossible to force your will towards love for God, and so it is impossible to manufacture perfect contrition. You must first recognise that God loves you and all those who you care for, and therefore could never abandon you to damnation. Only then will real love for God spontaneously explode in your heart, driving out any fear of Hell.

But even after all this, there is a higher way. Christ was willing to suffer damnation for the sake of the salvation of his enemies. Your love for God and neighbour is not perfect until you find yourself in the position where you are truly willing to do the same. Only when God has promised you eternal bliss, and yet you are willing to sacrifice it for the sake of the salvation of the other, can you truly be said to have achieved union with the divine.

The Gospel as Unconditional Promise: “How beautiful are the feet of those who preach good news!”

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The Gospel is – at its’ core – an unconditional promise: “God loves you, unconditionally”, but this is merely a statement of abstract theological fact. It does not begin to become “Good news” without some sort of elaboration attached: “That’s all well and good, but what does it mean for ME?”

  • “God loves you, unconditionally, therefore he has sent his son to take a bullet for you; to heal you; to take your spiritual sickness upon himself, dive into the depths of Hell and annihilate it forever.”
  • “God loves you, unconditionally, therefore he will never leave you or reject you, even if you leave him or reject him.”
  • “God loves you, unconditionally, therefore he will not allow you to commit spiritual suicide.”
  • “God loves you, unconditionally, therefore your eternal future is secure and you need not fear an everlasting Hell.”

If this promise is never spoken – if the radical implications of this promise are never preached from the pulpit – the Gospel is simply never being proclaimed; some other language game is being played.

A question is raised: To whom does God speak this promise? The answer should be obvious after even a cursory survey of scripture: He speaks this promise to the entire creation. Christ died for everyone and everything. Nothing and no-one could be excluded from his sovereign love and salvific will. Hell has no place in the eschaton.

But as Paul says in Romans: How are men to call upon him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without a preacher? And how can men preach unless they are sent? As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who preach good news!”

Many people in the present age are walking in darkness. They are already stuck in Hell. They are unaware that God’s love intends them, and that their future is secure. They fear the worst for themselves, their friends and their family. They are terrified that Hell may await for themselves and those whom they love. These people need to have the Gospel promise spoken to them, to liberate them from slavery to sin and free them for a life of love and thankfulness. This is why we must evangelise: God loves everyone, but not everyone knows it yet and until they do, God’s mission remains incomplete.

Eucharistic Theology – Communion for the Divorced and Remarried: A new Catholic Code of Canon Law

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Relevant paragraphs from the Herlihy catechism concerning open communion:

  1. Anyone may receive the Catholic Eucharist provided that they do not explicitly deny the real, substantial, physical presence of Christ (which is the only way it is actually possible to “receive unworthily”. Having doubts about the real presence does not constitute explicit denial). In this way, all are invited to the Lord’s table and all are welcome, including infants, provided that they are able to consume the host respectfully, not spitting it out or performing some other sacrilegious act of desecration.
  2. Purely as a matter of prudence and to maintain reverence for the sacrament, in ordinary circumstances the Catholic Eucharist should be withheld from the unbaptised; but this is not an inviolable rule, so unbelievers and unbaptised people may be admitted in emergencies (and if some slip through and receive in ordinary times, it’s no grave scandal; not “the end of the world”)
  3. Catholics may receive the Eucharist in any church where this sacrament is valid. But as a matter of prudence and politeness, they should respect the decision of whatever church they are attending in terms of whether or not to approach the table.
  4. Catholics may never receive from churches with an invalid Eucharist even in emergencies.

Addendum: Being out of full communion wounds Christian unity, but does not prevent shared sacramental communion. Contrary to current Catholic opinion, sharing the Eucharist is not a statement of full communion in terms of dogmatic belief, although for some reason it is perceived as such at the present time.